Tis idle to suppose that raw and undisciplined Men are fit to oppose regular Troops, and if they were, our present Military System is too expensive, for any funds except that of an Eastern Nabob; and in the Civil line instead of one head and director we have, or soon shall have, thirteen, which is as much a monster in politicks as it would be in the human form.

George Washington, letter to William Fitzhugh, October 22, 1780

I beg you will be persuaded that no one would be more zealous than myself to establish effectual barriers against the horrors of spiritual tyranny, and every species of religious persecution - For you, doubtless, remember that I have often expressed my sentiments, that every man, conducting himself as a good citizen, and being accountable to God alone for his religious opinions, ought to be protected in worshipping the Deity according to the dictates of his own conscience.

George Washington, letter to the United Baptist Churches in Virginia, May, 1789

Ignorance & design, are difficult to combat. Out of these proceed illiberality, improper jealousies, and a train of evils which oftentimes, in republican governments, must be sorely felt before they can be removed.

George Washington, letter to John Jay, May 18, 1786

"The bosom of America," he [Washington] declared a few months later, was "open to receive … the oppressed and persecuted of all Nations and Religions; whom we shall welcome to a participation of all our rights and privileges … if they are good workmen, they may be of Asia, Africa, or Europe. They may be Mohometans, Jews or Christians of any Sect, or they may be Atheists.

George Washington, quoted in Paul Boller’s George Washington and Religion

This is not as direct a source as I would like. I hope the quote is good, but I confess some doubts when I see Washington including atheists in it.

It is much to be wished (but I think a good deal to be doubted) that the States would adopt a liberal and proper line of Conduct for the Government of this Country. It should be founded in justice. prejudices, unreasonable jealousies, and narrow policy should be done away. competent powers for all general purposes should be vested in the Sovereignty of the United States, or Anarchy and Confusion will soon succeed.

George Washington, letter to John A. Washington, June 15, 1783

The wishes of the people, seldom founded in deep disquisitions, or resulting from other reasonings than their present feeling, may not intirely accord with our true policy and interest.

George Washington, letter to John Banister, April 21, 1778

I confess however that my opinion of public virtue is do far changed that I have my doubts whether any system without the means of coercion in the Sovereign, will enforce obedience to the Ordinances of a Genl. Government; without which, every thing else fails.

George Washington, letter to James Madison, March 31, 1787

Remember, especially, that for the efficient management of your common interests, in a country so extensive as ours, a Government of as much vigour as is consistent with the perfect security of Liberty is indispensable. Liberty itself will find in such a Government, with powers properly distributed and adjusted, its surest Guardian.

George Washington, Farewell Address, September 19, 1796

I confess however that my opinion of public virtue is so far changed that I have my doubts whether any system without the means of coercion in the Sovereign, will enforce obedience to the Ordinances of a Genl. Government; without which, every thing else fails.

George Washington, letter to James Madison, March 31, 1787

To bring Men well acquainted with the Duties of a Soldier, requires time - to bring them under proper discipline & Subordination, not only requires time, but is a Work of great difficulty; and in this Army, where there is so little distinction between the Officers and Soldiers, requires an uncommon degree of attention - To expect then the same Service from Raw, and undisciplined Recruits as from Veteran Soldiers is to expect what never did, and perhaps never will happen.

George Washington, letter to John Hancock, February 9, 1776

Washington really wanted to rely less on militia. Could this also have relevance to sending National Guardsmen into a place like Iraq?